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20121207
20121207
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and 1 us have come to this area because we can walk to this area and there are business and is ago lighting designer in the area that we are working with right now on a lighting project. so there is a few other things that we have written down that i just wanted to point out there is about 60 design professionals in the western sonoma area and about 40 within the valley area and so we would like to stay, continue and continue to grow our businesses there. >>> good afternoon commissioners my name is jeffery miller with miller company architect i want to follow up on the previous speaker i have a business that has been there for 50 years and in my building there are several interior designers and lighting designers my wife is a designer who has a space had the building as well. we actually share facilities copy machines and thing like that, that we cross fertilize, it seems that we are part of the creative density of the area and having designers, landscape architects and argument connects architects and interior poem shrewded from the area i do not understand that. i have been to
world of care and support. and what we have discovered is that people that use a, what they get out of that is what we call the network of fact. we have jill in the center of the network and you can see on the upper side where you have a health care provider to put information into her fault about her health care. if you have heard daughter using the mobile application to update people on the go. you have the neighbor that tax the schedule to see when he is going shopping -- this is an illustration of a network of fact or network model of the good life. the neighbor says, always check on line to see what joe needs. the physician's assistant says it is easy to share the test results. the personal care worker says i've posted on the loose handrail and they handled it right away. her sister says, i am part of a team now, what a relief. out of this idea of the network of fact, one is that this is what joe wants. this is her key to a good life. her network is actually her gateway to a good life and her ability to stay home. and we will launch a touch screen interface for those that want
work with staph to do that as soon as your direction to us is clear even if we don't have that specific language right now. >>> right so if that is the case, then we will include that property alone. >> commissioner hillis. >> i'm trying to get more information on the 601 project and i guess we don't have it here but i know, i do not need to get excited because it's an academy of art and so i don't know what it is or why they have applied for a c eu because what would happen if we approved this? >>> there is some may be we asked them to apply for a c u. >> i don't remember if which asked them to apply for the c u. >>> for all of the proposed --. >> yeah, this is their architecture program this is my understanding and it's in a building in a relatively new building. i don't remember it's only a few years old. my only --. >> so what happened to that c u at this point? >>> it would become invalid you could not approve a probability there. if you passed this pro vision that says that educational institutions are no longer permitted in the sally, you could not legalize t
adults to get more involved with physical activity using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by movi
that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with our tenants. it's an honor to have you guys here. enjoy the day and it's an honor to welcome jane back to the hatchery. (applause) >> good morning, my nam
and that culminated on the conditional use application that we submitted to you in december. with many iterations even after that. i went back and sort-of looked at the number of meetings that i had attended for this project and it actually was over 120 task force and community meeting and whoever said it was 100 meetings was wrong it was more than that it was actually closer to 150. so, you know what you have on the screen are some of the key objectives that we pulled out but if i were to summarize it as a domier and what i heard the task force say and what i try to live by is the notion that we needed to respect who came before us, particularly as it related to uses on the ground and also the ally system but i also think hat task force recognized that the area isn't perfect and especially in the areas of open space and certain other elements with respect to pedestrian satisfactory and the treatment of the pedestrianian specially on some of the major affairs and harrison there is more work to be done and i think what they tried to do is capture a lot of those ideas in the zoning for this parcel whi
historic building or not. this legal office use, changing the roaning or keeping the zoneling in a way that does not allow office which, is eventually what is happening is none permitted and none conforming and there is nothing that would force those business toss leave or not allow new office tenants to continue to build their space it would only impact the proposals for new development in those areas and so i want to be clear about that because there have been some comments about that issue and i want to be clear that just being a none conforming use does not mean that you would be required to leave or not operate any longer. >> right and then there is some sort of accessory expansion within the same building that you can do based based upon or no? >>> yes if you have a none conforming use, you can propose none residential -- because this is in the eastern neighborhoods and it will apply to anymore and it's basically in none conforming uses that are none residential and not office can expand up to 25% with a conditional use authorization -- that the thanks not true -- so
geishas and all this expensive saki we ordered from you and you tell us to be quiet. actually we don't mind but someone next door complained. someone complained? about us? tell them to come here and complain to our faces. no. no. wait! i understand. they're just jealous. we're here having a good time and they're all alone, right? that's it. they're just jealous. maybe so but actually it's not just an ordinary person that complains. what do you mean not an ordinary person? someone with three heads, six legs? a ghost? very funny, sir, but actually it's a samurai. samurai? next door? why didn't you tell us. we don't like samurais? sometimes they just kill people by mistakes. sorry about that. samurai? okay. okay. we understand and we'll be quiet. okay. ladies sorry. parties over. see you next time. sorry. we will go to bed now. shall i bring out the futons. yes but don't put them in a row. put the heads together so we can talk in bed. is it okay for us to talk in bed. that's no problem talk as much as you like. okay. thank you. samurai next door told us to shut up. that's okay. i don't
than you are today. use this resource. work to improve yourself because you will have a happier life in the end. will see it on one of my morning walks or bike rides. thank you very much. >> my goodness, what a rich a day. we can all have hope and not be fearful about anything. we take that attitude that we can reverse things. haute not going to tell them what my next birthday is going to be. she was born in 1932. one woman looked up at me and says, dear? she found out it was ok. we can all have the ability to do whatever we want to do. when she is not wrapping -- rapping, she is the co-director on the center for elder abuse and neglect, the university of california, irvine. a program called the institute of aging to 2007, i am proud to serve on that board. from catholic university in washington, who is started with the first song. there is no excuse for elder abuse. >> i am very happy to be here to talk to you all a little bit about elder abuse. there is about 5 million people. ♪ a little louder. you want me to rap? ♪ i need some help. my brain elasticity is not too god. i -- go
any sort of metal or did they use hardened rocks of some sort to shape their stones? . >> most of what they did was stone. metallurgy was just starting to move up into northern chijuajua at that time and they were working with copper. that was just ornamental, so there was no metal going on at all other than imported bells. >> and the shells, they went down to cortez -- not lake -- the cortez sea to get, was that mostly hard or brittle? . >> it was hard but not tool hard. the colorado plateau is covered with chert, a glassy rock that is really really good for making tools, making very sharp edges. you find there are pieces of chert all over the place and you can still cut your skin open very quickly with it and it's been sitting out in the open. >> where does chert come from? . >> it's a marine rock that's mostly silica. you find it in these layers, sandstone layers. if you are especially in a marine or water environment, you will find this layer of chert. it's in all colors, purple, green, red, blue. it's a beautiful rock. . >> one thing i wanted to ask you, the review in the paper re
) >> thank you, thank you, mayor ed lee. thank you, phil ginsberg and the hatchery for hosting us. i use open data. our company was founded three years ago using open data. we are one of the first sustainable companies to use open data and be sustainable innovation, meaning we can generate revenue and keep mobile applications for government going. we are really excited to be here today. this is our official launch of apple-liscious. i would like to thank our team, kevin, rick robbins, moment of all [speaker not understood] for my cto and co-founder. this was a very long, long journey with the city, but we had the help of leaders like phil, mayor lee, jay driving behind the scenes, the efforts for business to work with government. and i think we've accomplished that with this unique partnership moving forward. we're excited now there's cross-department collaboration with the san francisco arts, with the san francisco public art which has now been thanks to sean working late last night, putting the public arts into golden gate park. this is providing access. it's providing efficiency, and it's
with other cities. i am very lucky to be part of the u.s. conference of mayors, and they allow me to represent san francisco as the innovative center for all the rest of the cities across the country. so we get to compare information and there. what these days i will get to talk to you while i am in washington, d.c., and you can hear what i am saying across there, so we can enjoy it -- wherever i go, you know i will be working and not fooling around. finally, we also are using technology to join our private companies in hiring san franciscans. hopefully some of your kids, some of your grandkids as well, are going to enjoy some of these great jobs in san francisco, because the companies that are here, many of them have agreed to use the virtual hiring practice called hiresf.org and share the technology to hire online send franciscans. we're doing the right here in our great city. i have a chief innovation officer, jane, who is working in my office. he keeps a good connection for both me and them members of the board of supervisors to share in what are the technologies and what they
. we discovered sf data sets, and we were absolutely delighted to have the resources available to us through these offices. and they really were the driving factor behind our development moving forward. obviously they weren't exactly where we needed them to be at that time, and we had worked with multiple departments now on cleaning up the data sets obviously. and then putting that back out there. one of our biggest pin points or struggles has been with the legislation and the old models of the [inaudible] the regulations and laws which are being slowly worked on through the legal departments and the san francisco's legal department. but essentially we found the experience through innovation office has been driving the initiatives through and helping us develop and the data sets have bon become cleaner. they have become easier for us to use and the process has become a lot more efficient. >> school. -- cool. i was told if you have a question you should line up at that microphone right there. if you're coming up -- no, he did youant [speaker not understood]. >> i don't have a question
-- they were used in the dances that we have today. >> (speaking spanish). >> this movement -- >> span spanish. >> are >> >> (speaking spanish). >> are here and it means soul. >> (speaking spanish). >> and when we go to move our bodies -- >> (speaking spanish). >> they mean the essence. >> (speaking spanish). >> when they go to work the earth -- >> (speaking spanish). >> is the contact with our mother nature. >>nature -- >> (speaking spanish). >> that will live us food, take care of us and receive us before we die. >> (speaking spanish). >> we also have this and movement of work. >> (speaking spanish). >> or conversation. >> (speaking spanish). >> which is the key to receive love. >> (speaking spanish). >> and all these type of movements were followed by this style of dance with its own co n coring on gravy. >> >> (speaking spanish) (music). (applause). >> can you play the music please? >> i want to dance with everybody. >> well, he's not there. (music). >> okay do you have any questions? we need to have some minutes and would like to answer some questions. yes? >> (inaudible). >> is it har
an almost round 40 a. for us, it is a the best way to connect because they live very far away and we do not get to see the mother rise. it is an important way for all of us to be able to connect with our families and with our communities. for americans living with disabilities, many of whom are also aging americans, broadband and commuters -- computers can provide even more critical tools for health and wellness. they allow someone with a speech impairment to e-mail her doctor, a person who is mobility limited to its in glasses -- classes online, and for someone else to work at home. 29% of people with disabilities would join the work force if telecommuting were actually a viable option for them. before working at home, however, broadband is now a necessity for anyone searching for a job. many job openings are only posted online. about 80% of fortune 500 companies only accept job applications online. and about 60% of working americans use the internet as an integral part of their jobs every single day. if you do not have broadband, you are increasingly cut off from these opportunities.
for directing staff to consider legitimatization of uses policy commissioner apt knee knee. >>> aye, borden aye hillis aye. >> would? no commissioner president fong. >> so moved that commissioner passes four to three with commissioners moore, sag guya and voting against. >> i heard there was cp to allow ground floor reds terrible mr. teeing is that something that you were putting before us here,. >> sure and it's something that i'm hypothecate putting before you as a package because of the affordable housing trust fund created a scenario where we could not increase affordable housing requirements lieu a new rezonings and legislation and through certain exemptions one being that the site was getting 20% bump in gross developable area the problem with ct and the regional commercial district is while they permanent housing on every floor, on the ground floor of large project, they restrict it and they don't permit it and so, to meet that 20% criteria in the charter, we would need to remove that planning prohibition of residential uses in the district on large sites on the ground flo
are televised and you can find us on s f governor to have been.com come and i'll tell you to follow the items and you cannot predict the length of the items but you can see the progression a little bit because i know it's hard to give up an entire day the question that i have for people here would you be onerous if you knew it was next week and would it be importantly for the people to come back. >>> i agree, we apologize that this haps but i think, we will go ahead and call the question to what the commissioners want to do. >> commissioners continuance for the one week on the 18th. >> antonini no , borden eye, moore, aye, commissioner chair wu that mission fails commissioners. i'm sorry -- continuance because it's a majority i apologize so that hogs passes three to one with commissioner antonini voting against.. >> commissioners that will place you on your last calendar items we need to here from the drench yes because it was continued at this later hour we can put it later on the calendar next week and we can actually make it time specific as well and make all of the d r's time sp
. it reminds us of what the history was. >> there is a section for dogs and plenty of parking. transit is available on the 28 bus to get you very easily. the part is ada -- park is ada accessible. it is also a natural lake. this is your chance to stroll around the lake and let the kids run free. it also has many birds to watch. it is a place to find and appreciate what you -- a wonderful breath of fresh air. wonderful breath of fresh air. come and experience in this park ♪ from coast to coast, cops are cracking down... on seat belt violations. buckle up, dand night, or expect a ticket. it doesn't matter who you are or where you live, they'll be on the lookout. cops write tickets to save lives. ( seat belt clicks ) click it or ticket. >> hello. you're watching the show that explores san francisco's love affair with food. there are at least 18 farmers markets in san francisco alone, providing fresh and affordable to year-round. this is a great resource that does not break the bank. to show just how easy it can be to do just that, we have come up with something called the farmers' mark
are taking a look at some of the most exciting technologies in elevators. george, tell us about destination elevators. >> this is the technology of the future. probably the biggest single investment in elevators. san francisco has embraced the technology more than any other city in the country. a big advantage with us is passengers get to their floors sooner and there is more opportunity of customization of features for individual service. four issues of security and accessibility, this is a big advantage over traditional elevators. digest i understand these are rehabilitated upgrades of existing elevators? >> yes, these are upgrades to the original elevators from 1980. all the controls and wiring has changed but the physical mechanisms are the same. >> how much energy to these use? >> with all of the things that we did hear, energy savings is about 50% from where we started. that is a significant improvement for such a major system. >> tell me how it works. >> this is the hall keypad, which controls the elevator. the system asks where you are going before you get into the elevator. imagine
and using our hands like bird wings. the birds are flying high above the treetops. in the forest is a river. we will lift our wrists and lower them to make water waves. very soft. you can hear the water flowing. in this river are fish. we will take the right hand over our left and use our thumbs like fish fins and let your fish swim through the water it takes a big dive. >> and growing next to the river are a bed of flowers. opening one hand onfinger at a time watching the flower petal blossoms. we will take our other hand and turn it into a butterifiy much the butter fly will fly, fly, fly the and land on the flour and watch it fly away. drinking can a deer. take your thumb and the outside a n antlers. the deer hears a noise and in the distance is a hunter with a low and arrow. he sees that deer and aims for it. see your target and takes a shot and he misses and the deer escapes. the hunter's frustrated. i can't believe i missed that. he decides that hunting deer is not a night idea next time he will aim for an apple. thank you participating, you can sit down. give yourself a clap. those
of miracles. i think those of us here in this room with you always feel that, oh, my god, that's not enough turkeys for the food bank, for the needy families and that's not enough food for the hungry seniors that come through our meal site at many of our social service agencies. but yet every time, every time around this year thanksgiving and christmas, we find very, very generous donors and check suddenly appear like mayor will be delivering 100 turkes, 150 turkeys to the school for that we are very thankful. mayor, we are celebrating thanksgiving with 3,000 of the very low-income seniors in chinatown. and as of now i think that we got all the turkeys covered. thank you very much. [laughter] >> and the gratifying thing is we have a lot of volunteers this year. we have so many volunteers that we had to put a stop last friday and say, we have no more space to put you. so, i think that people feel that around thanksgiving and christmas is not just a time to spend with our own families, but really a time to give back to the community. so, i urge all of you to pass the word that there's a lot o
and applause] >> wow, is this amazing or what? two times in three years. we can get used to this. right, tito? yep. anyway the only thing i can say is thank you to these 25 guys right here. for years i took math and they told me that five time five is 25 but i think five times five is one because they showed they can play 25 as one individual and that's how they got it done. [cheers and applause] now, i'm going to talk to my family -- [speaking spanish] >> thank you. i just want to say i'm enjoying this ride. this morning and talked to sergio and got to -- i am not -- [inaudible] but i have my card so i know i'm not going to be stopped today so great pleasure to be on this side, all my teammates that make me so happy and so proud. and now the young kids are taken over and two is not enough. we are going for a three-pete. [cheers and applause] >> tito, does not want to speak spanish. okay. no problem. >> i'm legal. >> now we're going to copy up a couple of players you're going to love. >> >> [speaking spanish] let's hear it for pablo sandoval . [cheers and applause] [speaking spanish]
cities and teams. are you ready? they were supposed to be better than us after a bunch of trades. the los angeles dodgers are -- all right. the giants. they're down to two games of cincinnati. they win three straight. the reds are? >> audience: out of here! >> it has to be louder for the next two. are you ready? the giants go to st. louis and need to win there and back home. the st. louis cardinals are? >> audience: out of here! >> now for the big one. the mighty american league detroit tigers. you ready? the detroit tigers -- they are? audience: out of here! >> you never disappoint. here is my partner mike. >> well, we have become an organization of expertation. there's expectation when you win a championship in 2010 and there is expectation when you get in that ballpark everyday and it's over flowing with your love and affection and there is purity in the formula that this organization goes about trying to meet those standards of excellence. it starts with the fans of historians that we call investors that kept us here in san francisco and goes to the front office
the opportunity of having local fund to be used to be leveraged with other funds to accomplish that and it's an extremely important benefit benefit and so i urge you in the course of actions that you have been taking and to add this to your achievements thank you. >> thank you.. >> good evening commissioners tim col ron on behalf of the housing commissioner and is i'll be brief it was a really enthusiastic reception for this project at our meeting last week. one of our well known members said this is a killer project this is the first exoskeleton that we have reviewed and this particular, one of the thing that we really liked was the bridge to the park and we are building a very large new city park 75 feet in the air it needs very large connections to it to ensure that it's well used and so there is so much to like approximate it and one of the thing though, i'm a little concerned aboutship inclusionary housing how it related on this site but it's not something that need to be solved now and it in no way distracts from our support of this project it should move ahead and it's a terrif
there is a multiplecasion problem in here and i want you to see if you can tell us when we are done what it is. something will repeat 3 times. [applause] okay. which one of you figured it out? yes. >> 49, hum... >> i can see how you would say that, why do you say that? there is 49 of something. okay. did you notice the turns? the spins? how many were there in one piece? yes. no. yes. 9. how many times did we repeat that? how many times? 3. 9 times 3 -- is 27. we did 27 turns but we were going, 1, 2, 1, 1, 2, 1. that's a sophisticated math concept, you were not wrong. i bet you will grow up to be a mathematician. i will give you my address you will have to send me your first paycheck because i taught you this. at this point we would like to thank you very much for coming. if you have any questions. i don't know if we want to open it you will for questions. may be just a few? okay. yes. what's your question? >> how do we get in this program? that is a good question. >> it's an interesting question because the answer with the 3 of us is the same. what i want to point out i look like i might be from indi
of us asian american authors and asian authors in general tend to go back and write about our ancestors and write about things in our past not our specific past but may be of of ancestors and mothers and grand mothers. we have been telling their story. i think the generation to come, will be telling stories of living here. it will be different stories. but the oppression of our voices have been for so many, many years, if you think back the first writer who was read in terms of asian american was maxine kingston. i read her in high school and was greatly affected by reading about the woman warrior. before her there were few. there were some but didn't make that economic splash. they were never read in a large way. maxine was the first one we read her in school we knew of her. she was not out there like anny tan was when she wrote the joy luck club. so much of it is timing. it meant all the history and the voices before then had been silent. my generation of writers came in and we heard stories of women and men and the family of a different generation. a lot of us had been writing about
of ally and so we call it is roadway curve and that allows us to lighten up the building and make it less monolithic and you will see it again here, and then finally here and then it activates the street and the idea was to actually create some activity within the -- to push the cars towards the street so it become a more urban retail experience and with that, i'm available for questions if you need me thank you for your time. >>> thank you. >> thank you commissioners-and i just want to go over additional outreach issues and we have held three meetings on the probability and it was a mainly a meeting to reach out to the neighbor neighborhood and get input early on and andy mentioned that he has been a member of the neighborhood for many many years and wanted to continue that outreach and be involved with the neighborhood and taking in that input and he has given out his personal cell phone number and he is the project sponsor on the front line ready to response respond and take input from neighbors and in response to community meeting they have made selfchange to the project. the ori
you made small steps into the desert within us or listened for the gutterals longed deep within our throats, you would have come bearing gifts. i have nothing in red that i would not abide in green. el batanabi wrote the heart of our silken tanab, what need have we for you? no poem has ever enough red but that its blood might river beneath the veins of its people. beneath the desert sun, one man by one man by one man breathes six. thousands of tons wrung sonorous from the sky. where is god? black-eyed woman, the street dogs are running wild. will you save me? simple white ignorance, even the desert has gone into hiding. there is no more meaning here than the crested moon holds towards a dying grove of date trees. i am for the arabic, for the transcription of the arabic, zato dates over fire-baked bread. the twin rivers have already called for us a history. our poets have already explained to us the desert. by what right have you come? who have you have seen the rustic crane in the tree, no chimes but for its delicate wide beak, ushers an intemperate reprieve? 33 beads on a string, w
love you provided us selling out all 89 home games and all the wonderful fanses, and i see some of you that traveled withed team, road warriors to make road games feel like home games. you inspired us. we know you filled this plaza on sunday when we were in detroit. we know you cheer friday your couches at home, from your neighborhood street parties and then throughout october with the city we lit up the city. it was a washid orange from coit tower to the ferry building to right here at city hall. what can we take away from our 2012 giants? i believe we can take away life lessons. vuch teachable moments for our children and our team did face challenges and whether facing injuries or newly acquired players or facing elimination game one after another. what were the life lessons? never give up no matter how high the mountain is to climb. have integrity and conduct yourself with professionalism. did this team do that? absolutely. play with a team with unselfish devotion. trust one another and love your team teammates and in always do so have fun and it's meant to be played a
from spain, some of them with the spanish royal armies; other irish influx arrived from the u.s. for the construction of railroads used to transport sugar cane to the sugar plantations. that was at the end of the 19th century. and then at the beginning of the 20th century, we're talking 1902, 1910, before odono that i mentioned before, this man who gave his name to -- he was very proud of this lighthouse. the cubans offer hospitality to general alexander alejandro o'reilly. he rose through the ranks of the spanish army. the spanish sent alexander o'reilly to cuba to form a militia. he was appointed governor of louisiana and head of the army later on. he arrived in august, 1769, and took formal possession of louisiana for spain. think of new orleans and cuba, in particular havana, governors there were also in cuba so there was all this traveling from one city to another because later when i got my ph.d. from tulaine university and i went to the irish channel. it's interesting, the irish history connected with new orleans. so the o'reilly family has been in louisiana for centuries
of us. that can really help and donate at red cross .org and we thank you for your generosity. it was just two years ago that we captured the championship since moving to san francisco and i think we're happy we didn't have to wait until 52 years. [cheers and applause] we've got another trophy in this great city by the bay. [cheers and applause] so today giants fans once again you are all world champions and together we are giants, so we have a wonderful program planned for you today and i know you're anxious to get this started started and bring the guys out and celebrate your 2012 san francisco giants so let's get started. first of all we are joined by a number of special dignitaries who have helped to make san francisco one of the best baseball towns -- no, the best baseball town in america. [cheers and applause] let us now welcome and please show your love and enthusiasm the mayor of city and county of san francisco the honorable edwin lee. former mayor and current lieutenant governor the honorable gavin newsom. the city chief of protocol charlotte schultz, and her hus
that our experience here locally as well as a lot of research has been done both in the u.s. and throughout the world has shown that building bike facilities like this, ones that are connected and ones that are convenient and for people of all ages and abilities is important to increase bike mode share and that will help ensure the goal of having 20% trips by bike by the year 2020 so thank you very much. [applause] (train horn). >> the port manages the seven and a half miles of waterfront, and for planning purposes the area is divided into a number of subareas. we are in the southern waterfront sub area and within each subarea we have a number of stakeholders but we always have an advisory committee that we work closely with, so the southern waterfront advisory committee has played a key role in the creation and development of a blue green way project, and has been an active participant in supporter of these two developments, the expansion of heron's head and the bike way on cargo way and i want to introduce the long time chair of the southern waterfront advisory committee, karen pierce. [
help us a lot. so she goes into the bushes with the leprechaun. about an hour later, they are coming out, she's adjusting her skirt, fixing her hair, and the leprechaun says, thank you very much. how old is your husband? she says, he's 44. he's a little too old to be believing in leprechauns, isn't he? so that's for those who don't respect their own heritage. in addition to that idea of the cross roads of identity and the politics of identity, the other thing i had wanted to speak about for a second was the cross roads of community building. my -- i've been fortunate enough with my experiences, which have all been in the san francisco bay area, to have the ability to go and to listen to a lot of different music and to perform, to go and listen, and i can't say enough what events like this do for young folks for myself who have to negotiate through the pressure of a dual identity. i can remember way back going to the irish arts festival that used to be at ft. mason and in the same day being able to hear kila and angela mcnamera. it was a sonic history lesson in a day. the best thing
. usually other shops cult the fish very thin, like a very thin piece of cake. sometimes they use sponge cake instead. that is terrible. it's something good about it. fish cake very good. [slirping] good noodles. all good soup. i could eat another bowl of noodles but maybe not today. it's 16 or more. i have smaller change. can i give it to you're in your hand. i pay you one coin at a time. one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, so what time is it now? it's nine. >> ten, eleven. i see 16 more. i will come back same time. thank you very much. the clever man left the noodle shop. he saw the whole thing behind the wall. he gave the noodle man so many compliments and he was going to ask for this count so. he ask strange question. one, two, three, four, five, what time is it now? nine. ten eleven, twelve. why did he ask such a question. one, two, three four, five, what time is it now. nine, ten, eleven, this is the ten. oh, i see. that was the victory. i'm going to do the same thing tomorrow night. this man goes through all the change and went outlooking for the noodle shop. it was
as being much older. >> in the course of writing the play and using various actors, he became younger. this chinese actor is more like a character in his mid to late 30's, excentric, a career bachelor who is into russian literature and who fashions himself kind of patterned after the japanese artists of the 30's and 40's. he has round sort of glasses and a braid. but getting back to the question of creating characters, for example african american characters, i'm also caution -- i had written another play called johann that was about an african american gi and a japanese wife that got married in post war japan. i wrote that play 20 years ago. i wouldn't do it for about 8 years or so because i just didn't feel comfortable about being a japanese american writing an african american character. you have to think about, too, this whole idea of political correctness has both an up side and a very bad down side. one of those is people tend to be very cautious and not want to try things like that. i eventually through my relationship with danny glover pulled it out of my drawers -- out of the
back and forth because he wasn't sure if he was exactly right. you use spherical trigonometry to figure it out and he was pacing back and forth and i could see he was going through his numbers going, okay, a lot of people came for this, am i right about this? and i thought about these fierce-looking mayan dudes who came out of chaco and the great house, the tree rings taken out of it, show it was constructed every 18.6 years. every time the moon came through the gab, they did massive construction for it. so you know it was the time and you know there was somebody pacing up there just checking whatever watch he had, looking at that gap and thinking, i hope this is the day. and it was the day. we stood there and waited and he said first light, we all looked and we couldn't see it. he had a better eye, he had been watching this much longer than us. but then we started to see the glow. and then the orb of the moon rose into this narrow gap between two twin towers looking north into the rocky mountains. and as that happened, i turned around and as the south -- and i see out of the rocky moun
, theater commentator for klaw. chloe worked for several years in u.s. and uk theater companies and is the recipient of the allen wright award for arts journalism, the sundance institute arts fellowship and the nea fellowship of journalism. in 2006, she received a best columnist nomination at the annual san francisco media excellence awards and her first book on acting was published by farber and farber in the uk and farber, inc., in the united states. let's welcome phillip and chloe >> hi there, phillip. >> hi, chloe >> so, this play, it's been quite a journey. we're talking 3 1/2 years, maybe nearly 50 different drafts and 5 workshops? . >> five workshops, yes. >> so, looking back at the journey, how has it been for you and has it come out as you expected it would? . >> what's interesting is if you work on a play this long, normally there are times that it becomes redundant and you get a little bored with the piece. it's only natural. it's pushing 4 years now. this one was interesting in that it never got boring or ever felt redundant and each thing that we did over these almo
until i wanted to write something telling their story much the second book is the test book for us writers you hear that a lot where the publishers are wondering if the author has a second book. everybody here i feel sitting here all of you have one book in you. whether it's a family story or your story whether it's ancestors whether it's your history you want to write about. but it's the second one that's hard. i felt that when i turnod the computer and thought, now i have to write book number 2. i had in mind that i wanted to write something very different from women of the silk that was strictly about the feminist chinese women during the turn of the century and i wanted to write about my japanese culter. i didn't have the story or the culture unfortunately because i was born in san francisco, half chinese and half japanese but raised in the chinese culture. when it was time to write the second book and i knew i wanted to explore my japanese side it was going to be difficult in the way that i didn't know the culture. right away i had to learn a lot. it was something that was not
says, i used to draw it without air. its lines were easy to follow. and a girl says the sky today is lacking because the cypress is in pieces. and a young man says, no, the sky today is complete because the cypress is in pieces. and i say to myself, it's not obscure or clear. the cypress is in pieces. there is only this. the cypress is in pieces. . >> a poem i wrote shortly after 9-11. the terrorists for rachel cory and all those who were idealists and who actually believed that they could make an effect and social change. the terrorists who lives amongst us is not you, the terrorist who lurks in the shadows of our crowded city streets isn't me. he's not a demon with bulging eyes, a twisted mouth full of dirt, a crooked mouth, fangs driping blood. it's not the savage guner waiting for our school on their way to school. no, this heinous replica of satan doesn't look like a jew. dopt make a habit of supplying the motives of sin with colors of skin because it's skin deep. a student with dreams of statehood or a teenage girl driven by desperation and fear or a dentist or an apprentice
about seniors and technology, a lot of people would have wondered why seniors would want to use computers, but that has shifted. over the next few years, as all of us move toward being seniors, we will not be wanting technology. we will be demanding it. the field is going to change, and more and more people are going to be here. so the ability to make technology accessible is there. those of us charged with doing this have a really important role. we have to be able to provide the tools for the technology in ways that the people can hear. i am happy to be your speaking with you because i think this is an incredibly important topic. this afternoon, there is a workshop on addressing multiple barriers for accessing technology, and it will be a brainstorming session where someone from my office and a couple of other people will be leading a discussion of what issues people run into and how you deal with them. i think it is a really important topic and i think it is probably one of the most important things people could be talking about now. for all of us, technology is here and goin
looking at where we are 25 years later in the bay area, looking at how hard it is for us to strive to keep our theater is going, etc. i like to think that i'm not struggling quite as hard, personally, but what i mean by that, the intention, the commitment. particularly, to produce works that would not be produced in other places, and also to really nurture women of color artists. i think that is something that has not shifted for me in those 25 years, and it is good to see that brava remains committed to that kind of work. ♪ >> when people talk about the reflection of the community, we can only go from what we have on our staff. we have a south asian managing director, south african artistic director, latino community out rich person. aside from the staff, the other people, artists that we work with being a reflection of us, yes, the community is changing, but brava has always tried to be ahead of that trend. when i came in, i tried to make it about the work that shows the eclectic mission district, as well as serving the mission. those are the types of things those are the types of thin
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